Drama

Where the Crawdads Sing Review

Based on the best selling 2019 novel of the same name, Where the Crawdads Sing, directed by Olivia Newman, is a magical and muddy modern fairytale of a beaten down woman triumphing over her oppressors in 1950s North Carolina. It weaves a captivating, although heavy handed at times, story of romance, coming of age and murder mystery that will leave you wistfully yearning for the lawless freedom of ...

The Phantom of the Open Review

It is 1976, and Maurice Flitcroft (Mark Rylance), a crane driver in his mid-40s, is being made redundant at the Vickers Armstrong shipyard in Barrow-in-Furness (Cumbria, England). His wife Jean (Sally Hawkins) encourages him to pursue his dreams. When Maurice was a boy he loved books, painting and languages, but was prevented from following these paths. Now, he is a middle-aged man who has a step-...

The Woodcutter Story Review

Mikko Myllylahti’s debut feature film tells the story of an idyllic Finnish village descended in to madness with the closure of the local sawmill.  Pepe (Jarkko Lahti), lives a simple, happy life filled with ice fishing and labour at the sawmill. Together with his colleague, neighbour and friend Tuomas (Hannu-Pekka Björkman), they exist like contented kings of not much in particular. However,...

Elvis Review

Elvis Aaron Presley was an American singer whose music and influence made him an icon of the 20th Century. From 1956, when he sold 10 million singles for the RCA company in twelve months, until his untimely death in 1977 at the age of 42, Elvis was a global star. His effect on new music waned in the later 1960s, however his fame and his influence were intact until he died. He was dubbed The King o...

Men Review

Alex Garland brings two of the most talented actors of modern cinema and theatre together, stacks the odds against one of them and gaslights an entire viewership in the process in Men, a gorgeously absurd new film that ponders the question: if a strange bloke turns up naked at your house but doesn’t actually get inside, has any harm been done? Garland takes a different approach at highlighting the...

Little Tornadoes Review

It’s Australia, 1971, and a revolution is happening in the cities. But in the country, things stay exactly the same.  The first thing I noticed about LITTLE TORNADOES was the overwhelming soundscape. The insects were singing. They chirped, or shrieked, in a way that was almost claustrophobic. It made it seem like a horror film, but the jump scare never came. Instead, I had to sit with the op...

Top Gun: Maverick Review

After more than thirty years of service as one of the Navy’s top aviators, Pete Mitchell is where he belongs, pushing the envelope as a courageous test pilot and dodging the advancement in rank that would ground him.

To Olivia Review

It’s easy to be a bit snobby about a film like TO OLIVIA. It’s so very earnest. Made for British tv, but released in cinemas in Australia, it tells the story of author Roald Dahl and his Hollywood star wife, Patricia Neal. Considering Dahl’s famous writing, you might expect a childish, macabre, and wickedly funny take on the lead up to his success with ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’. Alternat...

Everything Went Fine Review

Sophie Marceau (the object of every 90s Bond fan’s desire) is a woman whose father asks too much in Everything Went Fine, the new film from acclaimed French director François Ozon. Based on Emmanuèle Bernheim’s autobiographical novel Everything Went Well, the story follows two sisters dealing with the aftermath of their father’s major stroke and the often comedic hoops through which they must jum...

How to Please a Woman Review

HOW TO PLEASE A WOMAN is a fun little comedy about great sex, housework, and the mature woman. Being a mature woman at this point (in longevity if not life accomplishments), I had a really great time watching it. Sally Phillips plays Gina, a busy woman who is feeling unfulfilled, but hasn’t quite noticed yet. She’s taken for granted, both at work and by her husband. The highlight of her day is her...

The Northman Review

In a one-two punch of New England folklore and carelessly spilled beans, Robert Eggers established himself as a modern auteur to watch. I remember seeing The Witch on a weekday afternoon in a huge, empty cinema – factors that only added to the feeling of isolation and unease. I left with a massive appreciation for the role that sound plays in horror and a newfound goat phobia. Watching The L...

The Duke Review

Jim Broadbent is an idealistic (and wholly unsuccessful) poet who doesn’t think he should have to pay to watch telly in The Duke, the latest (and final) film from dear departed British director Roger Michell. Michell directed Hugh Grant at his floppiest-haired and most charmingly befuddled, and had the good sense to pull out of helming that second Craig-era Bond film that no one likes nor remember...

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