Laura Blundell

Laura’s first in-cinema viewing experience was The Lion King, granting her both an early sexual awakening over bonafide hottie Simba and a healthy distrust of Disney. She would go on to study Film and Television at Curtin University, only to make an ill-advised switch to Creative Advertising a year later. Her torturous final year incited an interest in horror in general and the New French Extremity in particular, as Laura forced herself to feel again. Her interests now lie in independent cinema and watching her husband shoot people in the face (in video games).

8

Critic

Everything Went Fine Review

Sophie Marceau (the object of every 90s Bond fan’s desire) is a woman whose father asks too much in Everything Went Fine, the new film from acclaimed French director François Ozon. Based on Emmanuèle Bernheim’s autobiographical novel Everything Went Well, the story follows two sisters dealing with the aftermath of their father’s major stroke and the often comedic hoops through which they must jum...

7

Critic

The Northman Review

In a one-two punch of New England folklore and carelessly spilled beans, Robert Eggers established himself as a modern auteur to watch. I remember seeing The Witch on a weekday afternoon in a huge, empty cinema – factors that only added to the feeling of isolation and unease. I left with a massive appreciation for the role that sound plays in horror and a newfound goat phobia. Watching The L...

7.5

Critic

The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent Review

See Nicolas Cage nail the Nouveau Shamanic acting technique in The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent as Nick Cage, an enigmatic former star who plays Russian roulette with roles because it reminds him he’s alive (and he owes 600k to the hotel he’s been inhabiting throughout his divorce). Whether your favourite Age of Cage is his 90s action superstardom, his more meaningful outings from the likes...

8

Critic

Happening (L’Événement) Review

Not to be mistaken for that Shyamalan film featuring a very confused Marky Mark, Audrey Diwan’s Happening follows a young woman in 1960s France facing an unwanted pregnancy in her last year of university. Based on the semi-autobiographical novella of the same name (L’Evénement in French) by Annie Ernaux, the film tackles a confronting subject in uncomfortable detail, forcing its audience int...

2

Critic

Morbius Review

I’m not entirely sure what goes on at those culty gatherings hosted on MarsIsland (perhaps an Elizabeth Báthory approach to skincare) but it seems to work for probable real-life vampire Jared Leto, whose inability to age is, at this point, slightly concerning. It’s a shame, then, that his dedication to acting is not given the same priority as his quest for eternal youth. Known for going way too ha...

7

Critic

The Duke Review

Jim Broadbent is an idealistic (and wholly unsuccessful) poet who doesn’t think he should have to pay to watch telly in The Duke, the latest (and final) film from dear departed British director Roger Michell. Michell directed Hugh Grant at his floppiest-haired and most charmingly befuddled, and had the good sense to pull out of helming that second Craig-era Bond film that no one likes nor remember...

8

Critic

Blind Ambition Review

When it comes to wine, there are those of us who exhibit a Michael Scott level of knowledge – perhaps we buy based on the label or on the heaviest savings ratio at our local. Then there are others – four Zimbabwean refugees who fled their country separately and somehow ended up in a wine tasting team competing at an international industry event, let’s say – who can guess from a s...

7

Critic

Cyrano Review

Little did he know that when he made his 2005 adaptation of Pride & Prejudice, Joe Wright would be cementing his place in my bubble bath cinema of joy. Having rewatched his version countless times from the warm, sudsy confines of someone else’s bathtub, I feel the same sense of calm and contentment each time that only a two-hour massage or beta blockers bring. With his new film Cyrano (an adap...

4

Critic

Uncharted Review

From the director of Venom and a comedy short simply titled Masturbation comes the first entry in another video game adaptation, Uncharted. As one currently backseat gaming through Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End, my expectations for how this inevitably shallow franchise starter would compare were…not high. Tom Holland looks nothing like Nathan Drake, Mark Wahlberg looks nothing like Paul Newman (or Vi...

3

Critic

Aline Review

Second only to Cher, I find a Celine Dion impression one of the most satisfying to absolutely nail. With the iconic 90s feel of Britney and Shania, and the nigh unreachable technical heights of Whitney Houston, it’s a certain type of achievement when you ace a rendition of “It’s All Coming Back to Me Now”. French actress Valérie Lemercier is competent at the impression (though the singing is perfo...

8

Critic

Belfast Review

In an interview with Stephen Colbert, Belfast Boy Kenneth Branagh speaks on the origins of his new, uncreatively-named film – an autobiographical account of his own childhood in the capital of Northern Ireland during The Troubles. His was a time of great change when the village he resided in was thrown into violence and turmoil in 1969 from fighting between Protestants and Catholics (or Unio...

9

Critic

Licorice Pizza Review

Gary Valentine (Cooper Hoffman, prodigal son of the late Philip Seymour) is a 15 year old student and part time actor with dreams of entrepreneurship. When he notices ’22’ (25) year old Alana Kane (Alana Haim of the eponymous family band) assisting with high school yearbook photos of his peers, he falls rather hard. We follow the saga of their not-quite relationship as they try to get ...

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